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VIKING FILMOGRAPHY BY ITINERARY

Films provide a vivid window into your travels, especially when their settings shine through as a main character. Such is the case with many of these films—whether biographies or histories, comedies or dramas. We hope these selections will complement your travel experience, inspire your wanderlust and provide a cultural lens through which to view a place.

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GRAND EUROPEAN TOUR

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

ROMANTIC DANUBE

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

DANUBE WALTZ

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

RHINE GETAWAY

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police. A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director:Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

CITIES OF LIGHT

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

The Illusionist (2006)
Director: Neil Burger
In late 19th-century Vienna, Duchess Sophie von Teschen is reunited with renowned illusionist Eisenheim after 15 years. The duchess and Eisenheim realize that they still love each other, but she is soon to be wed to the Crown Prince Leopold in what would be for him a marriage solely in pursuit of power.

Immortal Beloved (1994)
Director: Bernard Rose
This film looks at the life and death of Ludwig van Beethoven, including a famous love letter Beethoven wrote to a nameless beloved. Ludwig van Beethoven dies and his assistant/friend Schindler proceeds to deal with his last will and testament.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)
Director: Philip Kaufman
Just when three intimately close friends are deeply involved with the events of the Prague Spring of 1968, Soviet tanks crush the nonviolent rebels and their lives are changed forever.

Amadeus (1984)
Director: Milos Forman
This is the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, told by his rival Antonio Salieri. Salieri, a devout man who believes his success and talent as a composer are God’s rewards for his piety, wishes he was as good a musician as Mozart and is perplexed as to why God favorites Mozart.

Yentl (1983)
Director: Barbara Streisand
Yentl Mendel is the boyishly klutzy daughter and only child of long-widowed Rebbe Mendel. Rebbe teaches the Talmud to local boys and to Yentl, but secretly because girls were not allowed to learn the law in those days. When her father dies, Yentl disguises herself as a boy in order to get admitted to a yeshiva, to study the texts, traditions, Talmud and more.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

TULIPS & WINDMILLS

Ne me quitte pas (2013)
Director: Sabine Lubbe Bakker, Niels van Koevorden
This documentary, comedy, drama is set in the Belgian countryside, a place where time seems to stand still. Bob and Marcel share their sense of humor, their solitude and their craving for alcohol.

The Fifth Estate (2013)
Director: Bill Condon
Based on real events. After gaining access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in US history, Julian Assange (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg (played by Daniel Brühl) are confronted with a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society and what are the costs of exposing them?

In Bruges (2008)
Director: Martin McDonagh
In this comedy-drama starring Colin Farrell and Ralph Fiennes, two hit men are on a makeshift holiday in Bruges, Belgium, after a hit gone wrong. While awaiting word from their boss, one is interested in sightseeing and the history of the place, while the other can’t wait to escape. Farrell won a Golden Globe for his performance.

Any Way the Wind Blows (2003)
Director: Tom Barman
On a warm day in June, in the Flemish port city of Antwerp, a handful of people with little in common go about their lives, yet they all end up at the same place for a grand party.

If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969)
Director: Mel Stuart
A group of American tourists take an 18-day guided bus tour of nine European countries (from London to Rome) and humor ensues.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

HEART OF GERMANY

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlondorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

IMPERIAL CITIES OF EUROPE

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

RHINE RHAPSODY

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

PASSAGE TO EASTERN EUROPE

Just Between Us (2010)
Director: Rajko Grlić
Set in Zagreb, this movie follows two middle-aged brothers leading parallel lives and navigating a web of relationships with wives, children and mistresses.

Horseman (2003)
Director: Branko Ivanda
This fascinating film is set in the early 18th century where the borders of the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Venice meet. The action and conflicts examine the struggles of living between two empires and two faiths: Catholicism and Islam.

Marshal Tito’s Spirit (Marsal) (1999)
Director: Vinko Brešan
In this light comedy, the ghost of revolutionary Marshal Tito appears to some citizens on the Dalmatian island of Vis. As news spreads, the mayor sees the event as a tourist attraction and, to capitalize on Tito’s ghost, transforms Vis into a Communist-era outpost.

How the War Started on My Island (1996)
Director: Vinko Brešan
In this bold black comedy, it is 1991 on an unnamed Croatian island and the Croatian parliament has declared the island’s independence from Yugoslavia. But conscripts from the Yugoslav People’s Army barricade themselves in a garrison, refusing to leave.

One Song a Day Takes Mischief Away (1970)
Director: Krešo Golik
Considered by some critics as the best Croatian film ever made, this dramatic comedy set in the 1930s is told through the eyes of six-year-old Perica, who watches as a man at a family picnic tries to seduce his mother while his clueless father takes no notice.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

ELEGANT ELBE

The Illusionist (2006)
Director: Neil Burger
In late 19th-century Vienna, Duchess Sophie von Teschen is reunited with renowned illusionist Eisenheim after 15 years. The duchess and Eisenheim realize that they still love each other, but she is soon to be wed to the Crown Prince Leopold in what would be for him a marriage solely in pursuit of power.

Immortal Beloved (1994)
Director: Bernard Rose
This film looks at the life and death of Ludwig van Beethoven, including a famous love letter Beethoven wrote to a nameless beloved. Ludwig van Beethoven dies and his assistant/friend Schindler proceeds to deal with his last will and testament.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)
Director: Philip Kaufman
Just when three intimately close friends are deeply involved with the events of the Prague Spring of 1968, Soviet tanks crush the nonviolent rebels and their lives are changed forever.

Amadeus (1984)
Director: Milos Forman
This is the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, told by his rival Antonio Salieri. Salieri, a devout man who believes his success and talent as a composer are God’s rewards for his piety, wishes he was as good a musician as Mozart and is perplexed as to why God favorites Mozart.

Yentl (1983)
Director: Barbara Streisand
Yentl Mendel is the boyishly klutzy daughter and only child of long-widowed Rebbe Mendel. Rebbe teaches the Talmud to local boys and to Yentl, but secretly because girls were not allowed to learn the law in those days. When her father dies, Yentl disguises herself as a boy in order to get admitted to a yeshiva, to study the texts, traditions, Talmud and more.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

EUROPEAN SOJOURN

Just Between Us (2010)
Director: Rajko Grlić
Set in Zagreb, this movie follows two middle-aged brothers leading parallel lives and navigating a web of relationships with wives, children and mistresses.

Horseman (2003)
Director: Branko Ivanda
This fascinating film is set in the early 18th century where the borders of the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Venice meet. The action and conflicts examine the struggles of living between two empires and two faiths: Catholicism and Islam.

Marshal Tito’s Spirit (Marsal) (1999)
Director: Vinko Brešan
In this light comedy, the ghost of revolutionary Marshal Tito appears to some citizens on the Dalmatian island of Vis. As news spreads, the mayor sees the event as a tourist attraction and, to capitalize on Tito’s ghost, transforms Vis into a Communist-era outpost.

How the War Started on My Island (1996)
Director: Vinko Brešan
In this bold black comedy, it is 1991 on an unnamed Croatian island and the Croatian parliament has declared the island’s independence from Yugoslavia. But conscripts from the Yugoslav People’s Army barricade themselves in a garrison, refusing to leave.

One Song a Day Takes Mischief Away (1970)
Director: Krešo Golik
Considered by some critics as the best Croatian film ever made, this dramatic comedy set in the 1930s is told through the eyes of six-year-old Perica, who watches as a man at a family picnic tries to seduce his mother while his clueless father takes no notice.

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police. A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

PARIS & THE HEART OF NORMANDY

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

The Iron Lady (2011)
Director: Phyllida Lloyd
In this biopic, Meryl Streep plays former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, teetering on the edge of reality with dementia and recalling her rise and fall. Streep won an Oscar for her performance.

Atonement (2007)
Director: Joe Wright
Based on the novel by Ian McEwan, this powerful film unfolds over six decades, beginning in the 1930s when a crime with far-reaching consequences is committed. It won a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Queen (2006)
Director: Stephen Frears
Dame Helen Mirren turns in an Oscar-winning performance as Queen Elizabeth in this film that profiles the Queen’s attempts to treat Princess Diana’s death as a private family matter.

Gosford Park (2001)
Director: Robert Altman
In this period mystery-drama, co-written by Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes, a dinner party at an English country house is disrupted by a murder, affecting the lives of both the upstairs guests and the downstairs servants. The movie boasts an incredible ensemble cast, including Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Derek Jacobi and Clive Owen. Fellowes received a Best Writing Oscar for his contribution.

Shakespeare in Love (1998)
Director: John Madden
This delightful, romantic comedy-drama depicts an imaginary love affair between the bard and a budding actress who must dress as a man in order to land female roles in the playwright’s productions at the Globe Theater. The film won seven Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Actress for Gwyneth Paltrow and Best Supporting Actress for Judi Dench.

Barry Lyndon (1975)
Director: Stanley Kubrick
Regarded as one of Kubrick’s finest, this film tells the story of an Irish rogue who wins over a wealthy widow so he may take her dead husband’s position as an aristocrat in 18th-century England. It offers a fine portrayal of English society and class. The film won four Academy Awards, and Kubrick was nominated for a Best Director Oscar.

PORTRAITS OF SOUTHERN FRANCE

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

FRANCE'S FINEST

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

CHÂTEAUX, RIVERS & WINE

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

PORTUGAL'S RIVER OF GOLD

Mysteries of Lisbon (2010)
Director: Raoul Ruiz
This highly acclaimed movie traces the adventures of a jealous countess, a rich businessman and a young orphaned boy as they travel across Portugal, France, and Italy and to Brazil.

Genealogies of a Crime (1997)
Director: Raoul Ruiz
Catherine Deneuve stars in this suspenseful drama about a lawyer who agrees to defend her dead son’s friend in a murder case that involves a bizarre psychoanalytic society.

The Second Awakening of Christa Klages (1978)
Director: Margarethe von Trotta
This German film follows a desperate woman who robs a bank and then flees to Portugal, hoping a friend will help her.

The Last Run (1971)
Director: Richard Fleischer
George C. Scott and Colleen Dewhurst star in this story of a career criminal wanting to retire in the Portuguese fishing village of Albufeira. Reluctantly, he takes one last job: driving an escaped killer across Spain into France.

Lisbon (1956)
Director: Ray Milland
Ray Milland and Maureen O’Hara star in this suspenseful yarn about a smuggling ring and a wealthy husband imprisoned behind the Iron Curtain. This atmospheric crime movie was shot on location in Lisbon, providing scenes of the city at mid-century.

Reina Santa (1947)
Directors: Henrique Campos, Anibal Contreiras and Rafael Gil
One of many popular 1940s Spanish costume films, this historic drama portrays the life of Isabel of Aragon, the Spanish-born 14th-century queen of Portugal who rectified peace among different parties of the Portuguese court.

Hemingway & Gellhorn (2012)
Director: Philip Kaufman
This textured film chronicles the tumultuous relationship and then marriage between Ernest Hemingway and Martha Gellhorn, played by Clive Owen and Nicole Kidman. Much of it is set during the Spanish Civil War, when they worked side by side as war correspondents.

Biutiful (2010)
Director: Alejandro González Iñárritu
After being diagnosed with terminal cancer, Uxbal, a single father of two, is forced to deal with his life in order to escape crime in underground Barcelona and to regain spiritual insight.

The Way (2010)
Director: Emilio Estevez
A father heads overseas to recover the body of his estranged son who died walking the Camino de Santiago, or “The Way of Saint James,” and decides to take the pilgrimage himself. What he doesn’t expect is the profound impact the journey will have on him.

Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008)
Director: Woody Allen
While on a summer holiday in Spain, girlfriends Vicky (Penelope Cruz) and Cristina (Scarlett Johansson) take a tour of wildly romantic Barcelona and become enamored with the same painter (Javier Bardem), unaware that his tempestuous ex-wife is about to re-enter the picture. Cruz won an Oscar for her performance, and the film won a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture.

El Greco (2007)
Director: Yannis Smaragdis
In this biographical film, El Greco—the Greek painter who became a genius of the Spanish Renaissance—writes his life story as he awaits execution by the Spanish Inquisition. There are nice touches of history and a rich sense of place in this film.

Alatriste (2006)
Director: Agustín Díaz Yanes
This historically sweeping film depicts 17th-century Spain during the Eighty Years’ War, when soldier-mercenary Captain Alatriste, played by Viggo Mortensen, fights for the Spanish empire and his king, Philip IV.

Spanish Narration – Salamanca: The Heart of Spain’s Golden Age (2004)
Director: Ed Dubrowsky
This documentary showcases Salamanca, a rich jewel in a region that has played a significant role in the cultural history of Spain and in world history.

Talk to Her (2002)
Director: Pedro Almodóvar
When two men, Benigno and Marco, meet at the clinic where Benigno works, an unsuspected destiny begins. Marco’s girlfriend, a bullfighter, has been gored and is in a coma, while Benigno is also looking after another woman who is in a coma. Originally titled Hable con ella.

All About My Mother (1999)
Director: Pedro Almodóvar
In this comedy-drama, a nurse who oversees organ transplants loses her son to a car crash. To break the news to the boy’s father, whom he never knew, she journeys to Barcelona, revisiting colorful characters from her old life and meeting new ones along the way. The film won an Oscar and a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Land and Freedom (1995)
Director: Ken Loach
In the spring of 1936, a young unemployed journalist leaves his hometown of Liverpool to join the fight against fascism in Spain. The film won two Cannes Film Festival awards.

Man of La Mancha (1972)
Director: Arthur Hiller
Peter O’Toole and Sophia Loren star in this film adaptation of the much-loved musical. In this “play within a play,” Cervantes casts himself as the mad and wandering errant-knight Don Quixote, enlisting fellow prisoners to play supporting roles as he awaits trial with the Spanish Inquisition.

El Cid (1961)
Director: Anthony Mann
Charlton Heston and Sophia Loren star in this sweeping story of the Christian Castilian knight who wins the allegiance of the Moors during the Spanish Reconquest, only to be accused of treason by the Spanish crown. Nominated for three Academy Awards.

GRAND EUROPEAN TOUR & BELGIUM

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

Ne me quitte pas (2013)
Director: Sabine Lubbe Bakker, Niels van Koevorden
This documentary, comedy, drama is set in the Belgian countryside, a place where time seems to stand still. Bob and Marcel share their sense of humor, their solitude and their craving for alcohol.

The Fifth Estate (2013)
Director: Bill Condon
Based on real events. After gaining access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in US history, Julian Assange (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg (played by Daniel Brühl) are confronted with a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society and what are the costs of exposing them?

In Bruges (2008)
Director: Martin McDonagh
In this comedy-drama starring Colin Farrell and Ralph Fiennes, two hit men are on a makeshift holiday in Bruges, Belgium, after a hit gone wrong. While awaiting word from their boss, one is interested in sightseeing and the history of the place, while the other can’t wait to escape. Farrell won a Golden Globe for his performance.

Any Way the Wind Blows (2003)
Director: Tom Barman
On a warm day in June, in the Flemish port city of Antwerp, a handful of people with little in common go about their lives, yet they all end up at the same place for a grand party.

If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969)
Director: Mel Stuart
A group of American tourists take an 18-day guided bus tour of nine European countries (from London to Rome) and humor ensues.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

RHINELAND DISCOVERY

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

Ne me quitte pas (2013)
Director: Sabine Lubbe Bakker, Niels van Koevorden
This documentary, comedy, drama is set in the Belgian countryside, a place where time seems to stand still. Bob and Marcel share their sense of humor, their solitude and their craving for alcohol.

The Fifth Estate (2013)
Director: Bill Condon
Based on real events. After gaining access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in US history, Julian Assange (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg (played by Daniel Brühl) are confronted with a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society and what are the costs of exposing them?

In Bruges (2008)
Director: Martin McDonagh
In this comedy-drama starring Colin Farrell and Ralph Fiennes, two hit men are on a makeshift holiday in Bruges, Belgium, after a hit gone wrong. While awaiting word from their boss, one is interested in sightseeing and the history of the place, while the other can’t wait to escape. Farrell won a Golden Globe for his performance.

Any Way the Wind Blows (2003)
Director: Tom Barman
On a warm day in June, in the Flemish port city of Antwerp, a handful of people with little in common go about their lives, yet they all end up at the same place for a grand party.

If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969)
Director: Mel Stuart
A group of American tourists take an 18-day guided bus tour of nine European countries (from London to Rome) and humor ensues.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director:Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

CASTLES & LEGENDS

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police. A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

PARIS, BURGUNDY & PROVENCE

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

POLAND, PRAGUE, & THE ELEGANT ELBE

The Illusionist (2006)
Director: Neil Burger
In late 19th-century Vienna, Duchess Sophie von Teschen is reunited with renowned illusionist Eisenheim after 15 years. The duchess and Eisenheim realize that they still love each other, but she is soon to be wed to the Crown Prince Leopold in what would be for him a marriage solely in pursuit of power.

Immortal Beloved (1994)
Director: Bernard Rose
This film looks at the life and death of Ludwig van Beethoven, including a famous love letter Beethoven wrote to a nameless beloved. Ludwig van Beethoven dies and his assistant/friend Schindler proceeds to deal with his last will and testament.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)
Director: Philip Kaufman
Just when three intimately close friends are deeply involved with the events of the Prague Spring of 1968, Soviet tanks crush the nonviolent rebels and their lives are changed forever.

Amadeus (1984)
Director: Milos Forman
This is the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, told by his rival Antonio Salieri. Salieri, a devout man who believes his success and talent as a composer are God’s rewards for his piety, wishes he was as good a musician as Mozart and is perplexed as to why God favorites Mozart.

Yentl (1983)
Director: Barbara Streisand
Yentl Mendel is the boyishly klutzy daughter and only child of long-widowed Rebbe Mendel. Rebbe teaches the Talmud to local boys and to Yentl, but secretly because girls were not allowed to learn the law in those days. When her father dies, Yentl disguises herself as a boy in order to get admitted to a yeshiva, to study the texts, traditions, Talmud and more.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Ida (2013)
Director: Pawel Pawlikowski
Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film, this road movie has been called a masterpiece of Polish cinema. It follows a young woman on the verge of taking vows as a Catholic nun, only to discover her parents were Jewish.

Wałęsa: Man of Hope. (2013)
Director: Andrzej Wajda
This biopic of Lech Wałęsa follows the ascendancy of a humble electrician at the Gdańsk Shipyard from demonstrator to president of Poland, and examines the influence his rise to power had on other regions of Europe.

Forgiveness (2008)
Director: Mariusz Kotowski
Also screened under the title Esther’s Diary, this dramatic Holocaust film follows the adult daughters of two women who were best friends in 1940s Poland, but were later separated by Nazi horrors. One daughter learns of the past from her mother’s diary.

Jakob the Liar (1999)
Director: Peter Kassovitz
Set in a wartime Polish ghetto, this film stars Robin Williams as a shopkeeper who spreads hope among the imprisoned community by fabricating tales about approaching Allied advances, claiming he has heard such stories on his secret radio.

The Deluge (1974)
Director: Jerzy Hoffman
Hailed as one of the most popular movies in the history of Polish cinema, this film is based on the 1886 novel that recounts the thwarted Swedish invasion of Poland-Lithuania from 1655 to 1658.

Wesele (1973)
Director: Andrzej Wajda
This film, set at the turn of the 20th century, focuses on the wedding between a poet from Kraków and a peasant girl. Their ceremony turns into an examination of the century-long division of Poland under Russia, Prussia and Austria.

LYON & PROVENCE

Les Miserables (2012)
Director: Tom Hooper
Set in revolutionary Paris, this epic musical retells Victor Hugo’s timeless tale of Jean Valjean, who vows to turn his life of crime around despite being doggedly chased by Inspector Javert. The story culminates as turmoil engulfs Paris, leading to the Paris Uprising of 1832. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star; Hathaway won an Oscar as Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Madame Bovary (1991)
Director: Claude Chabrol
After Emma Rouault marries a country doctor, Charles Bovary, and finds herself bored, she seeks out the companionship of multiple men. Scenes include Lyons-la-Forêt, which is listed among the most beautiful villages in France, and Versailles, a city renowned for its châteaux and gardens. Nominated for Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

In the City of Sylvia (2007)
Director: José Luis Guerin
This film follows a young man, El, when he returns to Strasbourg in search of Sylvia, a woman he asked for directions in a bar six years before. As El searches the city for Sylvia, urban noise—church bells, footsteps, traffic and voices—evokes a sense of place.

Midnight in Paris (2011)
Director: Woody Allen
Part romantic comedy, part fantasy, this film follows a screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée and her parents. Each night, he finds himself in 1920s Paris salons, meeting the likes of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds, causing him to reconsider marriage. Scenes include historic sites such as Monet’s Garden, Musée Rodin, the Pont Alexandre III and more. Allen won an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; it also was nominated for Academy’s Best Picture of the Year Award.

Sarah’s Key (2010)
Director: Gilles Paquet-Brenner
This moving and enlightening film traces a modern-day journalist (played by Kristin Scott Thomas) who becomes entangled in the World War II plight of a young girl separated from her family by the Nazi Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942.

Julie & Julia (2009)
Director: Nora Ephron
With scenes of Paris, including the market stalls of the Rue Mouffetard, and mouthwatering French food, the story of Julia Child’s start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell’s challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book; stars Meryl Streep and Amy Adams. Streep won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Performance by an Actress.

Paris, Je T’aime (2006)
Director: Oliver Assayas
Twenty great filmmakers were given a simple challenge: create a short film (under five minutes) in Paris, about love. Whimsically beautiful, this film reveals Paris’s neighborhoods and the very human stories that they hold close. The Eiffel Tower, the Pont Alexandre III, the grave of Oscar Wilde and the lively Latin Quarter are just four famous Paris locations featured in this film.

La Vie en Rose (2007)
Director: Olivier Dahan
The back and forth nature of the narrative in this unchronological look at the tragic and famous life of the “Little Sparrow,” Édith Piaf, suggests the patterns of memory and association. Many scenes filmed in Paris, including Brasserie Julien, a belle epoque eatery once frequented by Piaf. Cotillard won the Academy Award for Best Actress, and the film won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

Ratatouille (2007)
Director: Brad Bird
In this delightful animated film from Pixar Animation Studios, Remy the rat will stop at nothing to become one of Paris’s top chefs, befriending a restaurant’s garbage boy to commandeer a kitchen. The movie won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

A Good Year (2006)
Director: Ridley Scott
Based on Peter Mayle’s book A Year in Provence, a workaholic trades his life selling bonds in London to cash in on a winery that was left to him by his dead uncle. With every day of his new life, Max grows out of his obsessive behavior and into a life he comes to embrace. Featuring the charming architecture and landscape of Vaucluse.

A Very Long Engagement (2004)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
A young woman searches for her fiancé, who has disappeared at the Battle of the Somme. Jeunet features dreamlike sequences and flashbacks, while portraying the horrors of war. Filmed in France, including the Héaux de Bréhat, a monument historique, and the Auberge Ravoux, known as the House of Van Gogh. This film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Originally titled Un long dimanche de fiançailles.

Amélie (2001)
Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
This romantic comedy traces the life of a timid waitress in Paris’s atmospheric and beautifully captured Montmartre neighborhood as she makes it her mission to help improve the lives of those around her while neglecting her isolated existence. Nominated for five Academy Awards. Originally titled Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Referred to by some critics as a “pastiche-jukebox musical,” this lush film follows a young English poet in Belle Epoque Paris as he falls in love with a terminally ill courtesan and cabaret performer in the Montmartre district. The movie stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor and won two Academy Awards.

Chocolat (2000)
Director: Lasse Hallström
In this “stranger comes to town” film, Juliette Binoche plays an itinerant chocolatier who opens a confectionary shop in a tiny French village, unleashing the appetites of the townspeople and the wrath of its ultra-conservative mayor. The film skillfully depicts the provincial charms of village life. Filmed, in part, in Flavigny-sur-Ozerain, one of France’s most beautiful villages. Johnny Depp and Judi Dench also star. Nominated for five Academy Awards.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Director: Steven Spielberg
This is a classic, graphic film of a WWII squad’s search for Private Ryan in the midst of the Normandy invasion. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

The Longest Day (1962)
Director: Darryl f. Zanuck
Zanuck’s epic recreation of the invasion of Normandy gets key events right and was filmed, in part, at Port-en-Bessin-Huppain. Nominated for five Academy Awards, with two wins.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991)
Director: Alain Corneau
When Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe finds out that his wife died while he was away, he builds a small house in his garden during his grief and dedicates his life to music and to his two young daughters. Filmed in Paris and Creuse—a rural area with beautiful preserved landscapes, stone architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Jean de Florette (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
Based on the two-volume novel by Marcel Pagnol, a greedy landowner and his backward nephew conspire to block the only water source for an adjoining property in order to bankrupt the owner and force him to sell. Filming locations in France include gorgeous Vaucluse, Gard and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The film garnered a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Manon of the Spring (1986)
Director: Claude Berri
In this sequel to Jean de Florette, featuring Yves Montand, a beautiful shepherdess plots vengeance on the men whose greedy conspiracy to acquire her father’s land caused his death years earlier. Filmed in the Provence region in southeastern France, known for its unique, beautiful landscapes. Originally titled Manon des Sources.

Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director: Blake Edwards
This gender-bending comedy starring Julie Andrews and James Garner tells the story of a struggling 1934 Paris lounge singer who concocts a scheme with her agent to perform as a man who is impersonating a woman. Difficulties ensue when she falls in love with a man. The movie won an Oscar for Original Song and Adaptation Score.

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)
Director: Blake Edwards
When the Pink Panther diamond is stolen, with the only clue being the Phantom’s trademark glove, Inspector Clouseau is put on the case.

Two for the Road (1967)
Director: Stanley Donen
In this romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, a married couple takes a road trip to Saint-Tropez, and as they drive through the striking natural landscapes of France, the audience is treated to flashbacks of previous trips that have influenced their relationship. Nominated for one Academy Award and two Golden Globes.

Children of Paradise (1945)
Director: Marcel Carné
One of the most famous French art films, Children of Paradise resembles a Manet painting with its dazzling depiction of 19th-century Paris streets, theaters and cafés. Originally titled Les enfants du paradis.

Cordeliers’ Square in Lyon (1895)
Director: Louis Lumière
This very short documentary offers viewers the opportunity to see what everyday life in Lyon was like in 1895, from architecture to fashion to transportation. A stationary camera looks across the boulevard at a diagonal toward one corner of Lyon’s Cordeliers’s Square, a busy thoroughfare. Originally titled Place des Cordeliers à Lyon.

BAVARIA TO BUDAPEST

Mission Impossible—Rogue Nation (2015)
Director: Christopher McQuarrie
When the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) is disbanded, Ethan Hunt goes after a shadowy and deadly rogue organization called the Syndicate, all on his own.

Forever My Love (1962)
Director: Ernst Marischka
Set in the 19th-century Austrian imperial court, this condensed version of the original “Sissi” trilogy portrays the romance between Empress Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) and Emperor Franz Josef.

Before Sunrise (1995)
Director: Richard Linklater
When an American man and French woman meet on a train from Budapest to Vienna, they end up sharing one evening, knowing it will probably be their only night together.

Sound of Music (1965)
Director: Robert Wise
Relive the kindness, understanding and sense of fun that Maria has with Georg Von Trapp’s seven mischievous children.

The Third Man (1949)
Director: Carol Reed
Set in postwar Vienna, this classic film stars Orson Welles and is based on the novel by Graham Greene.

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Heavenly Shift (2013)
Director: Márk Bodzsár
Set in Budapest, this film offers insights into the everyday lives of a remarkable ambulance crew. Originally titled Isteni müszak.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
Director: Tomas Alfredson
During the cold war in the early 1970s when an operation in Budapest, Hungary goes terribly wrong, the head of British Intelligence, Control, resigns. It is believed one of four senior figures in the service was a Russian agent, a mole. Espionage veteran George Smiley is forced from semi-retirement to uncover the Soviet agent within MI6.

Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985)
Director: Lamont Johnson
Based on a true story, this film tells the story about Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish banker and diplomat, who saved more than 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust while living in Budapest.

Bolse Vita (1996)
Director: Ibolya Fekete
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, three young Russians arrive in Budapest seeking their fortunes in this revealing portrait of life after Communism.

Mephisto (1981)
Director: István Szabó
A German stage actor finds unusual success in the popularity of his performance in a Faustian play as the Nazis take power in pre-WWII Germany and finds that his best performance is keeping up appearances for his Nazi patrons.

SWITZERLAND TO THE NORTH SEA

The Monuments Men (2014)
Director: George Clooney
Set during World War II, this film follows a team of art conservationists tasked with saving artwork and other cultural treasures from destruction and theft by the Nazis. The movie has an all-star cast, including Clooney, Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett.

The Reader (2008)
Director: Stephen Daldry
Set in post-WWII Germany, this drama follows the life of a young man whose affair with an older woman will haunt him for the rest of his life. Kate Winslet won an Oscar for her performance.

North Face (2008)
Director: Philipp Stölzl
Based on a true story, this suspenseful adventure film set in 1936 is about a competition to climb the most dangerous rock face in the Alps—the Eiger. As Nazi propaganda urges the nation’s Alpinists to conquer the Swiss massif, two reluctant German climbers begin their daring ascent.

The Lives of Others (2006)
Director: Florian Henckel-Donnersmarck
It’s 1984 in East Berlin and the population is strictly controlled by the Secret Police.A man who has devoted his life to ferreting out “dangerous” characters is thrown into a quandary when he must investigate a harmless man who is deemed a threat.

Good Bye Lenin! (2003)
Director: Wolfgang Becker
Filmed largely in Berlin, this must-see film set in 1990 tells the story of a young man who works to protect his fragile, ailing mother from the fatal shock of learning that East Germany, the country she knows and loves, no longer exists.

Run, Lola, Run (1998)
Director: Tom Tykwer
After her boyfriend, Manni, loses 100,000 DM that belongs to a very bad guy, Lola has 20 minutes to raise the same amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, Manni will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor events along Lola’s run. Originally titled Lola rennt.

Wings of Desire (1987)
Director: Wim Wenders
In this beautiful fantasy film, immortal, invisible angels in Berlin listen to the inner thoughts of the city’s citizens and provide comfort to the distressed. When one angel falls in love with a female trapeze artist, he chooses to become human so he can experience human feelings.

The Tin Drum (1979)
Director: Volker Schlöndorff
The highly acclaimed adaptation of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass’s surreal novel about a mute dwarf named Oskar, who lives through Nazi Germany. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1979. Originally titled Die Blechtrommel.

Memories of Berlin: The Twilight of Weimar Culture (1976)
Director: Gary Conklin
This fascinating documentary profiles the cultural richness of Berlin during the Weimar Republic through interviews with the city’s renowned writers, composers and artists.

Cabaret (1972)
Director: Bob Fosse
This classic film starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York dramatizes the life of a Berlin nightclub singer who is romancing two men as the Nazis rise to power in Germany. Fosse won an Oscar for Best Director; Minnelli and Joel Grey won Oscars and Golden Globes for their performances; and the movie won five Oscars including Best Cinematography and Music, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
Director: Martin Ritt
In this spy movie based on the John Le Carré novel, Richard Burton plays a British agent sent into East Germany to plant damning information about an intelligence officer.

Heidelberger Romanze (1951)
Director: Paul Verhoeven
While on a trip to Heidelberg with his daughter, a wealthy American businessman recounts a romance he had with a local girl 40 years before.

Admiral (2015)
Director: Roel Reiné
This action, adventure biography revolves around real-life figure Michiel de Ruyter, one of the greatest innovators in combat engineering of the 17th century. When The Netherlands is on the brink of civil war and is attacked by England, France and Germany, only one man, Michiel de Ruyter, can lead the country’s strongest weapon, the Dutch fleet. Originally titled Michiel de Ruyter.

Tim’s Vermeer (2013)
Director: Teller
In this documentary, inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer after becoming fascinated with the 17th-century Dutch painter.

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Director: George Stevens
This film is set entirely in an attic in Amsterdam where Anne Frank experiences her first love and tries to live through the war with her family. Nominated for eight Oscars and winning three, the film remains an enduring classic.

Nightwatching (2007)
Director: Peter Greenaway
This film tells the dramatic story of Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch. After Rembrandt (played by Martin Freeman) stumbles on a murderous cabal of merchants, he paints their secrets into his work.

Lust for Life (1956)
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Kirk Douglas stars as Vincent van Gogh in this film adaptation by the great Vincente Minnelli, filmed on location in The Netherlands and France.

Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)
Director: Peter Webber
This film tells the story about a young peasant maid who becomes a secret model for one of Johannes Vermeer’s most famous works Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Steady! (1952)
Director: Herman van der Horst
This short documentary is about the reconstruction of Rotterdam, following the city’s destruction by the Nazis in the Rotterdam Blitz. Originally titled Houen zo!

WATERWAYS OF THE TSARS

The Hermitage Revealed (2014)
Director: Margy Kinmonth
This fascinating film depicts the real-life story behind the magnificent art collection of one of the world’s greatest art museums.

Tsvet Natsii (2013)
Director: Sergey Nurmamed
Leonid Parfenov, a well-known Russian TV presenter, journalist and author of documentaries, dedicates this documentary to the 150th anniversary of Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky, a pioneer in color photography of early 20th-century Russia.

Russian Ark (2002)
Director: Alexsandr Sokurov
When a 19th-century French aristocrat takes a dreamlike journey through the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, he encounters notable figures from Russian and European history. Originally titled Russkiy kovcheg.

War and Peace (1956)
Director: King Vidor
Audrey Hepburn and Henry Fonda star in this condensed adaptation of Tolstoy’s classic, originally released in 1956.

Anna Karenina (2012)
Director: Joe Wright
Tom Stoppard adapted this screenplay from the famed Leo Tolstoy novel that is so central to Russia’s rich culture. Keira Knightley stars as the Russian aristocrat and statesman’s wife who has an affair with wealthy officer Count Vronsky, with tragic results.

Water (2006)
Directors: Julia Perkul, Anastasiya Popova
Witness breathtaking discoveries of water by researchers worldwide, from Russia, Kazakhstan, Switzerland and more, as they try to understand its explicit and implicit properties, which are phenomenal, beyond the common physical laws of nature.

Reds (1981)
Director: Warren Beatty
An epic film starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton, this saga recounts the events leading up to the Russian Revolution. It is brilliantly interspersed with interviews of witnesses to the uprising. Beatty won an Oscar for Best Directing.

Oblomov (1980)
Director: Nikita Mikhalkov
Middle-aged Oblomov sleeps much of the day, dreaming of his childhood on his parent’s estate. But when his boyhood companion, Stoltz, introduces him to Olga, Oblomov takes a country house near Olga’s and soon they’re in love. Originally titled Neskolko dney iz zhizni I.I. Oblomova.

Rasputin the Mad Monk (1966)
Director: Don Sharp
This fictional account of the famed Russian peasant and mystic, played by Christopher Lee, is loosely based on the accounts of Prince Yusupov, who is thought to have murdered the Romanov confidant in his St. Petersburg palace.

Doctor Zhivago (1965)
Director: David Lean
Based on the novel by Boris Pasternak, this epic drama-romance starring Omar Sharif and Julie Christie unfolds as World War I and the Russian Revolution are brewing. It earned Golden Globe Awards for Best Motion Picture, Director, Actor, Screenplay and Original Score; and is tied with Love Story, The Godfather, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and A Star Is Born for the most wins by a film.

Battleship Potemkin (1925)
Director: S.M. Eisenstein
In this silent film, the crew members of the titled warship rise up against their officers of the tsarist regime. It has been called one of the greatest propaganda films of all time, providing a look at pre-Soviet Russia.

CHINA'S CULTURAL DELIGHTS

China and the Forbidden City (2005)
Director: Tom Priestley
This 60-minute documentary explores the art, architecture and history of the imperial city.

Hero (2002)
Director: Zhang Yimou
Jet Li stars in this visually stunning masterpiece by the director of Raise the Red Lantern. Set in ancient feudal China, this simple tale is rendered in breathtaking color. Originally titled Ying xiong.

Lu cheng (2006)
Director: Yang Chao
Looking for meaning to their lives, two students journey across rural China with the hope of purchasing rare mushrooms to sell back home. Along the way, they are forced to decide whether to continue journeying or continue their education.

The World (2005)
Director: Zhangke Jia
The World, a theme park designed around scaled representations of the world’s famous landmarks, is seen through the eyes of a few of its staff. Originally titled Shijie.

In the Mood for Love (2000)
Director: Kar Wai Wong
After suspecting that each of their spouses is having extramarital activities, two neighbors, a woman and a man, form a strong friendship that they agree to keep platonic. Originally titled Fa yeung nin wa.

The Road Home (1999)
Director: Yimou Zhang
When businessman Luo Yusheng returns to his village from the city for the funeral of his father, he is reminded of the magical story of how his mother and father first met. Originally titled Wo de fu qin mu qin.

Farewell My Concubine (1993)
Director: Chen Kaige
This is a film with two parallel, intertwined stories of two performers in the Beijing Opera and the woman who comes between them. Originally titled Ba wang bie ji.

Shanghai Express (1932)
Director: Josef von Sternberg
This classic film is about Shanghai Lil, a “woman who lives by her wits along the China coast.” During a dangerous train ride to Shanghai, Lil rediscovers a former lover.

IMPERIAL JEWELS OF CHINA

China and the Forbidden City (2005)
Director: Tom Priestley
This 60-minute documentary explores the art, architecture and history of the imperial city.

Hero (2002)
Director: Zhang Yimou
Jet Li stars in this visually stunning masterpiece by the director of Raise the Red Lantern. Set in ancient feudal China, this simple tale is rendered in breathtaking color. Originally titled Ying xiong.

Lu cheng (2006)
Director: Yang Chao
Looking for meaning to their lives, two students journey across rural China with the hope of purchasing rare mushrooms to sell back home. Along the way, they are forced to decide whether to continue journeying or continue their education.

The World (2005)
Director: Zhangke Jia
The World, a theme park designed around scaled representations of the world’s famous landmarks, is seen through the eyes of a few of its staff. Originally titled Shijie.

In the Mood for Love (2000)
Director: Kar Wai Wong
After suspecting that each of their spouses is having extramarital activities, two neighbors, a woman and a man, form a strong friendship that they agree to keep platonic. Originally titled Fa yeung nin wa.

The Road Home (1999)
Director: Yimou Zhang
When businessman Luo Yusheng returns to his village from the city for the funeral of his father, he is reminded of the magical story of how his mother and father first met. Originally titled Wo de fu qin mu qin.

Farewell My Concubine (1993)
Director: Chen Kaige
This is a film with two parallel, intertwined stories of two performers in the Beijing Opera and the woman who comes between them. Originally titled Ba wang bie ji.

Shanghai Express (1932)
Director: Josef von Sternberg
This classic film is about Shanghai Lil, a “woman who lives by her wits along the China coast.” During a dangerous train ride to Shanghai, Lil rediscovers a former lover.

MAGNIFICENT MEKONG

Same Same But Different (2010)
Director: Detlev Buck
During a post-graduation summer trip to Cambodia, Benjamin Prüfer falls for Sreykeo Solvan. When he returns home to Germany, he discovers that Sreykeo is sick and he takes on the responsibility to save her. This film is based on a true story.

The Sea Wall (2009)
Director: Rithy Panh
An exacerbated widow finds herself troubled when her adult children leave to find their independence, and at the same time, she must try to erect a barrier against the sea to protect her rice fields from flooding. Originally titled Un barrage contre le Pacifique.

Two Brothers (2004)
Director: Jean-Jacques Annaud
This film follows the adventures of twin tiger cubs that were born among the temple ruins of an exotic jungle. Separated as cubs, the two tigers meet up years later but as forced enemies. Originally titled Deux frères.

City of Ghosts (2003)
Director: Matt Dillon
When an international scam that a con man is involved in goes sour, he flees to mysterious Southeast Asia to get his promised cut.

Lord Jim (1965)
Director: Richard Brooks
James Burke, a distinguished midshipman who rises to the rank of executive officer, is put ashore after a broken foot. After his recovery, Jim signs on as the executive officer of a rusty tub manned by a third-rate crew and a barbarous captain.

The Quiet American (2002)
Director: Phillip Noyce
Michael Caine stars as a British journalist stationed in Vietnam in the 1950s who becomes friends with a seemingly harmless American (Brendan Fraser).

The Vertical Ray of the Sun (2000)
Director: Tran Anh Hung
Beautiful from start to finish, this film follows three sisters, two of whom are happily married, or so it appears. Originally titled Mua he chieu thang dung.

Three Seasons (1999)
Director: Tony Bui
As characters in this film come to terms with the past, present and future of Ho Chi Minh City, their paths begin to merge.

Heaven & Earth (1993)
Director: Oliver Stone
Based on a true story, this film follows the life of a Buddhist Vietnamese peasant girl who survives a life of suffering and hardship during and after the Vietnam War.

Good Morning, Vietnam (1987)
Director: Barry Levinson
When an unorthodox and irreverent DJ is stationed in Vietnam to bring humor to Armed Forces Radio, he begins to shake things up.

MYANMAR EXPLORER

Only God Forgives (2013)
Director: Nicolas Winding Refn
A prosperous drug smuggler in Bangkok’s criminal underworld is about to have his world turned upside down when his mother wants him to avenge his brother’s death.

Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004)
Director: Beeban Kidron
This story picks up four weeks after the first film. Now that Bridget Jones is in love, she begins to question if what she has is everything she’s dreamed of having.

The Beach (2000)
Director: Danny Boyle
Richard, a nicotine-addicted traveler, finds a map in a Bangkok hotel that supposedly leads to a legendary island paradise where some other wayward souls have settled.

The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)
Director: Guy Hamilton
James Bond is called in to investigate the death of a scientist working on a powerful solar cell and finds himself chasing down famed assassin Francisco Scaramanga. In Bangkok, “007” is captured and placed in a dojo.

Around the World in Eighty Days (1956)
Directors: Michael Anderson, John Farrow
This adventure comedy is an adaptation of Jules Verne’s novel about a Victorian Englishman who bets that with the new railways and steamships, he can go around the world in 80 days.

ROOF OF THE WORLD

China and the Forbidden City (2005)
Director: Tom Priestley
This 60-minute documentary explores the art, architecture and history of the imperial city.

Hero (2002)
Director: Zhang Yimou
Jet Li stars in this visually stunning masterpiece by the director of Raise the Red Lantern. Set in ancient feudal China, this simple tale is rendered in breathtaking color. Originally titled Ying xiong.

Lu cheng (2006)
Director: Yang Chao
Looking for meaning to their lives, two students journey across rural China with the hope of purchasing rare mushrooms to sell back home. Along the way, they are forced to decide whether to continue journeying or continue their education.

The World (2005)
Director: Zhangke Jia
The World, a theme park designed around scaled representations of the world’s famous landmarks, is seen through the eyes of a few of its staff. Originally titled Shijie.

In the Mood for Love (2000)
Director: Kar Wai Wong
After suspecting that each of their spouses is having extramarital activities, two neighbors, a woman and a man, form a strong friendship that they agree to keep platonic. Originally titled Fa yeung nin wa.

The Road Home (1999)
Director: Yimou Zhang
When businessman Luo Yusheng returns to his village from the city for the funeral of his father, he is reminded of the magical story of how his mother and father first met. Originally titled Wo de fu qin mu qin.

Farewell My Concubine (1993)
Director: Chen Kaige
This is a film with two parallel, intertwined stories of two performers in the Beijing Opera and the woman who comes between them. Originally titled Ba wang bie ji.

Shanghai Express (1932)
Director: Josef von Sternberg
This classic film is about Shanghai Lil, a “woman who lives by her wits along the China coast.” During a dangerous train ride to Shanghai, Lil rediscovers a former lover.

UNDISCOVERED CHINA

China and the Forbidden City (2005)
Director: Tom Priestley
This 60-minute documentary explores the art, architecture and history of the imperial city.

Hero (2002)
Director: Zhang Yimou
Jet Li stars in this visually stunning masterpiece by the director of Raise the Red Lantern. Set in ancient feudal China, this simple tale is rendered in breathtaking color. Originally titled Ying xiong.

Lu cheng (2006)
Director: Yang Chao
Looking for meaning to their lives, two students journey across rural China with the hope of purchasing rare mushrooms to sell back home. Along the way, they are forced to decide whether to continue journeying or continue their education.

The World (2005)
Director: Zhangke Jia
The World, a theme park designed around scaled representations of the world’s famous landmarks, is seen through the eyes of a few of its staff. Originally titled Shijie.

In the Mood for Love (2000)
Director: Kar Wai Wong
After suspecting that each of their spouses is having extramarital activities, two neighbors, a woman and a man, form a strong friendship that they agree to keep platonic. Originally titled Fa yeung nin wa.

The Road Home (1999)
Director: Yimou Zhang
When businessman Luo Yusheng returns to his village from the city for the funeral of his father, he is reminded of the magical story of how his mother and father first met. Originally titled Wo de fu qin mu qin.

Farewell My Concubine (1993)
Director: Chen Kaige
This is a film with two parallel, intertwined stories of two performers in the Beijing Opera and the woman who comes between them. Originally titled Ba wang bie ji.

Shanghai Express (1932)
Director: Josef von Sternberg
This classic film is about Shanghai Lil, a “woman who lives by her wits along the China coast.” During a dangerous train ride to Shanghai, Lil rediscovers a former lover.

PATHWAYS OF THE PHARAOHS

Egypt 3D (2013)
Directors: Benjamin Eicher, Timo Joh. Mayer
Look at Egypt like never before in this 3-D documentary that explores gods, hieroglyphs, mummification, pharaohs, pyramids and the Great Sphinx.

Cairo Time (2009)
Director: Ruba Nadda
This romantic drama is about an unexpected love affair that catches a married woman and her husband’s colleague completely off-guard while exploring ancient Egypt by land and by sea.

Egypt Unwrapped (2008)
Director: J.V. Martin
A stunning National Geographic production that explores Egypt’s greatest mysteries, including the construction of the pyramids, the legacy of Ramses II and the story behind the Screaming Man’s haunting expression. Originally titled Secrets of Egypt.

Mystery of the Nile (2005)
Director: Jordi Llompart
The epic 3,260-mile descent down the world’s greatest river has eluded humankind for centuries – until now. In this documentary, a team of explorers set off to become the first to navigate the Blue Nile from source to sea.

Mysteries of Egypt (1998)
Director: Bruce Neibaur
A gorgeous visual survey of the history, ancient sites and natural wonders of Egypt as narrated by Egyptian actor Omar Sharif.