Menu
Menu
Search
Search
Search
Close

AMULET

June 2015

A FEAST FOR THE SENSES – WIN TICKETS TO RHS FLOWER SHOWS

What is the favourite fruit of ethno botanist James Wong? And what is cocktail gardener Lottie Muir’s top tip for growing and making your own cocktail ingredients? We talk exclusively to gardening experts and guests speakers at the Feast Theatre at RHS Hampton Court Flower Show.

At Viking, we are passionate about good food and we’re thrilled to be sponsoring the Feast Theatre at RHS Hampton Court Flower Show from 30 June to 5 July 2015, and also at RHS Flower Show Tatton Park from 22 to 26 July 2015. If you’re looking for culinary inspiration, the Feast Theatre is the place to find it. Enjoy lively cookery demonstrations and entertaining talks from the likes of James Wong, Lottie Muir, Rachel Allen and Greg Wallace. It's the place pick up tantalising recipes, foodie ideas and bring out the incredible in your edibles! We’re giving away 5 pairs of tickets to RHS Hampton Court Flower Show and 2 pairs to RHS Flower Show Tatton Park.

To enter, simply click here and answer one easy question >

We asked cocktail gardener, Lottie Muir, her top tip for growing and making your own ingredients for cocktails:

"Grow something you can't buy. We use masses of chocolate mint which smells like an 'After Eight'. It's ridiculously easy to grow and goes beautifully in a Chocolate Mint Julep with some bourbon over crushed ice and a dash of chocolate bitters. A cocktail is a feast for all the senses so grow beautiful plants that have beautiful blossoms as well as fragrant leaves. For example, blackcurrant sage has leaves you can use in a blackcurrant mojito as well as stunning scarlet flowers for a garnish. Have a few year round plants as well to keep some structure and shape in your flowerbeds. Staples like lavender and rosemary will provide year round flavour and scent."

Read more >>

Ethno botanist James Wong reveals what his favourite fruit is, and why:

"Oh, now that is a tricky question. Especially as it changes pretty much every week! At the moment it is the black raspberry. This rare fruit from North America is confusingly neither a raspberry nor a blackberry but an uber sweet, fragrant relative of the two. It produces large crops for next to no work, plus a whopping five times the antioxidants of most blackberry varieties. What's not to like?"

Read more >>

MORE IN THIS MONTH'S AMULET: 

I Never Go Away Without...

Win a European river cruise in the Viking photo competition

Join the Viking Book Club

Top